HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Goin back to ya roots?

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
AuthorMessage
davo
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 2207
Join date : 2016-10-19
Location : OZ

PostSubject: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 12:56 am

Do they matter anymore – are they important?

I was born in a working class suburb of Liverpool right next door to a pub. My grandmother [maternal] lived next door with my mothers youngest sister who had one son born out of wedlock to a Maltese sailor who promised to return,after the war,  but never did !

The sister married again and had 6 kids and we played happily for a few years in the same dusty streets. There was another sister lived a street away with her daughter and hubbie living in with two kids BUT for some strange reason they never seemed to want to play with us?

Then the splits slowly but inevitably came – we moved to another suburb to care for my fathers ageing father but still continued to journey back to the old street and cousins. Then the big split – daughter and hubbie from one street away left for Cheshire and a promise of fortunes with ICI ; as did my father eventually a few years later and then the eldest cousin a few years later still.

We kids just accepted all this as part of the daily grind – but now in the nether years and looking back I fear that what was happening was the disintegration of the extended family unit. And despite occasional visits either way was never the same. The family had been severed and disintegrated! Now I feel sad about it all and think we lost something valuable along the way!
Back to top Go down
Ciderman
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 696
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 78
Location : Hawkes Bay New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 1:11 am

It makes you think a bit doesn't it Davo.
I was an only child born in London 2 months after the start of WW2. My dad was a London Met policeman, as his father had been and his grandfather, but about 1942 he managed to join the navy, while mom and I put up with the doodlebugs. After the war he put in for a posting to Bermuda and he went on ahead while mum and I followed a few months later on a returning lend lease aircraft carrier called HMS Ranee. I lived an idyllic childhood, mostly in the water or on the water fishing. This meant , of course, that I lost most contact with my grandparents. I have no cousins as both my mum and dad had a sibling but they never produced offspring.

After another, shorter stint in New York dad was posted to the reserve fleet in Harwich for a couple of years where he got bored out of his brain and swore that HMS Tyne, the depot ship, was aground on gin bottles, he applied for and got a posting to NZ as an antisubmarine and minesweeping  specialist for 3 years. At the end of that time it coincided with the end of a commission period so he either had to go back to England or opt out. We all liked NZ so we stayed. I've been back 3 times but I think he made the right decision, with all due respect to the POM's on here!  smile

___________________________________________________
Civilisation is a veneer, easily soluble in alcohol!
Back to top Go down
http://www.geocities.ws/ciderman_nz/
davo
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 2207
Join date : 2016-10-19
Location : OZ

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 2:14 am

well that was my point in a way - all examples cited were 'making a better life' so that the next generation do better than the last - but my concern is the last generation get negected; forgotten and left behind so what did we really achieve -just something for ourselves and not others?? [with all due respect to your NZ adventure!]

as I sat in the balmy 24C morn sipping my bourbon I truly missed all my original family members and tried to summonded them back - but they would not return??
Back to top Go down
Ciderman
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 696
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 78
Location : Hawkes Bay New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 2:36 am

Like you , I sometimes miss my grandparents, my memories of them were always happy ones, even though my paternal grandad was a bit authoratative  he always looked after me (like a good copper should :-) ) and he took me on buses upstairs and showed me London, although it was a bit wasted on me at that age. My maternal grandfather had a dairy in Stepney. Yes a dairy with 50 cows in it! but while we were in Bermuda he sold up and bought a farm in Norfolk, where I went for a couple of school holidays, while I was a boarder at Colchester Boys High School, before we took off for the other end of the world.

___________________________________________________
Civilisation is a veneer, easily soluble in alcohol!
Back to top Go down
http://www.geocities.ws/ciderman_nz/
AlanHo
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 7425
Join date : 2016-10-16
Age : 80
Location : Solihull

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 5:47 am

I was born in 1937 in Solihull into a working class family. My dad was a foreman  fabric cutter at the Slumberland bedding factory, my mother had given up work when she married - she had worked at the Singer Motor Co as an upholsterer.

My very oldest memory is being held in my mothers arms - she was standing in a bay widow looking out into the road watching my dad walk away with a kit bag over his shoulder. I can still feel the tears from my mother dripping onto my face.  We didn't see my dad again until 1947 - he was one of the last to be demobbed having served his time in India and Burma in the Royal Signals Regiment.

My memories of the war are sketchy - I can remember the anti aircraft guns at the end of our road, the searchlights, the noise and being crammed into an air raid shelter.

My mother had to give up the house - couldn't afford the mortgage - and we went to live next door to my maternal grandparents. The house owners had evacuated into the countryside to dodge the bombing. My grand-dad was the father figure for me - but he was a drunkard and a wife beater which was not on reflection much of a role model. Fortunately I emerged untainted except for a lifetime total loathing of any man who uses violence against a female under any circumstances.

I remember in 1947 (I was 10) this man coming into the house with two kitbags and a battered suitcase. He left me and my younger brother to empty the bags whilst he spent time with my mother.
In one of the bags was a battered tin, inside which were dozens of round "sweets" - so we had one each. The taste was unbelievably bitter and we spit them out. Turns out they were some sort of bitter aloes given to troops to ward off malaria.

In Birmingham there is a bus route called the outer circle which as its name suggests travels the circumference of Birmingham's outer suburbs. I guess it takes almost 2 hours to complete the circle.  My brother and I were given pocket money - and most Sundays extra money to ride the outer circle bus for as long as we liked. I was naïve then and it took me years before I twigged why our parents wanted us out of the way for at least 2 hours.


It took some time to get used to having a proper dad - I don't think I ever did. As I grew up we got along fine and he was a good father - but somehow missed out on being a mate.

We could not afford to go away for holidays for years - I was 15 before I saw the sea. My early years were tough and frugal - good for your health but not for your pleasure. I was lucky and went to grammar school before getting an engineering apprenticeship and attending technical college and then Aston University.

When I was 25 years old I was working as a design draughtsman at an aluminium rolling mill in Birmingham which produced extrusions and plates of high strength aluminium for the aircraft industry. Suddenly out of the blue in was announced that we had been taken over by Kaiser Aluminum of America who were to invest millions on a major expansion scheme. The Americans moved in and 4 weeks later everyone over 50 years old was "let go" with a generous package and young people promoted in their place. I was fortunate to be picked and given the job of project chief draughtsman on the condition I had 3 months to prove myself or I was out of a job.  Overnight, I found myself in charge of senior designers I had been working for the previous day.

Fortunately I survived then flourished in the job and by the time I was 31 I was the engineering manager of the company with a staff of 230 engineers and maintenance craftsmen. 

in 1984 I was poached to go to Bahrain to work on the installation of an aluminium rolling factory there. I stayed for 13 years as chief Mechanical Engineer then Engineering manager before coming home in 1997 and retired at the age of 60. Life in the middle east was interesting - especially staying there through both Gulf wars. My job required me to travel all over the World. A nice touch was to travel business or first class everywhere and use Concorde for several USA trips. My late wife was able to accompany me on most trips. We had to live in the USA for a spell of 7 months to close down a rolling mill, make everyone redundant and move the factory to Bahrain. This was down in South Carolina where there are some rough tough hombres and I was provided with security because feelings about the factory being closed ran high.

So - I have had a good life, travelled widely and enjoyed most of it. My retirement was spoilt by my late wife dying of lung cancer in 2004 - but Lord luck struck once again and I re-married 5 years later to a wonderful gal who rescued me from a lonely bachelorhood.

I'm 80 in 3 months time and will try and avoid using it as an excuse to get old.

___________________________________________________
This post may contain controversial personal opinion, humour,  ironic comment or sarcasm. If I have accidentally offended you - please contact me and I will unreservedly apologise. If however it was intentional - it will add to my pleasure. whistle


Last edited by AlanHo on Sat Jan 07, 2017 10:27 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
davo
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 2207
Join date : 2016-10-19
Location : OZ

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 8:51 am

nice success story alan - who's theme I often quote -you can come from a poor background but that does not necessarily stop you making good!

my fathers family were rather reserved. His father a master bricklayer but never taught his son or I the trade. He also owned his one man taxi business but again it never passed on through the family. My maternal grandfather was a master butcher but never passed any skills on to his sons who probably in all honesty weren't interested, but me as a grandson would have been.

myself, sister and brother all finished up at grammar school years later but that's another story. we were never allowed to go to funerals as kids which was disappointing because they can bring families together. My father was an only lonely child but m mother one of 11 kids all with different personalities and they didn't always gell together! so i think families do not always stay close - depends on so many variables. but as a kid I enjoyed my mothers large family and still miss them all.
Back to top Go down
Irene
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 567
Join date : 2016-12-20
Age : 71
Location : Stafford, UK

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 9:24 am

What lovely, interesting stories, Gents.  

___________________________________________________
..
Back to top Go down
Ciderman
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 696
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 78
Location : Hawkes Bay New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sat Jan 07, 2017 9:14 pm

After my mother and father died, I set about getting my dad's naval records. I had to show that I was his child but the papers that were sent to me were interesting. Almost all of his commanding officers said similar things. "Bennett is a competent , well organised officer but he spends too much time worrying about the welfare of his troops."  This must be why I have no end of mementos engraved with "From the ship's company of HMS      ......" Silver propelling pencils, Carved book ends etc etc
And, like me, he was never afraid to make a pratt of himself, such as in this photo, although I don't know what a "Bull" is in this context!   smile

___________________________________________________
Civilisation is a veneer, easily soluble in alcohol!
Back to top Go down
http://www.geocities.ws/ciderman_nz/
Ciderman
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 696
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 78
Location : Hawkes Bay New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sun Jan 08, 2017 7:03 am

We lived in the house on the left one of only two houses on Bluck's Island in Bermuda. The other house was once owned by Denslow, the designer for "The Wizard of Oz" but when we were there Major Hal Kitchener , a nephew of Lord Kitchener, and a pioneer aviator of WW1
A naval boat used to come pick up dad every morning except for those days when he was Officer of the Day, and it would bring him home each evening. I was homeschooled by my mother and became good at history, geography, English and French and crap at maths and science!  Not her forte! smile

___________________________________________________
Civilisation is a veneer, easily soluble in alcohol!
Back to top Go down
http://www.geocities.ws/ciderman_nz/
andsome
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 4525
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 81
Location : Burntwood in Staffordshie, ENGLAND

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sun Jan 08, 2017 8:34 am

I was born in Handsworth Birmingham in 1936.  My father was assistant transport manager at John Lewis's in Birmingham.  He unfortunately was trapped between a lorry and the loading deck by the legs one day.  He seemed ok at the time apart from bruising, but developed lumps on his legs, which turned out to be blood clots. One eventually travelled to the brain and he died of cerebral haemorrhage at the age of twenty nine.  I was 2 and a half at the time.  My sister was born two weeks after he died, so we had it tough.  Our area was bombed heavily during the war, and we spent many nights sitting in the pantry,(the safest part of the house), listening to the bombers overhead, and the terrible sound of whistling bombs, designed to strike terror into us. I served a toolroom apprenticeship, and then did national service in the RAF. After a few years in the toolroom, I became a sales rep selling to the metal finishing industry serving with three companies, until at the age of 63, the manager at my last company caused me to have a nervous breakdown, so I retired early.  I married 'Er indoors at the age of twenty one in 1958, and we have been together since, and have two kids, a son and daughter and two lovely  grandchildren. Part of my national service was spent in Germany, and during this time we got married and rented a couple of rooms from a family just over the border in Holland.  We are still in touch with them.

___________________________________________________
Gustav Mahler is the finest composer who ever lived.

Back to top Go down
davo
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 2207
Join date : 2016-10-19
Location : OZ

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sun Jan 08, 2017 12:00 pm

nice story andsome - from some misfortune to effort and a happy life
Back to top Go down
andsome
V.I.P Member
V.I.P Member
avatar

Posts : 4525
Join date : 2014-09-24
Age : 81
Location : Burntwood in Staffordshie, ENGLAND

PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   Sun Jan 08, 2017 12:19 pm

davo wrote:
nice story andsome - from some misfortune to effort and a happy life

Like all couples we get our ups and downs,but in the main I wouldn't change anything

___________________________________________________
Gustav Mahler is the finest composer who ever lived.

Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Goin back to ya roots?   

Back to top Go down
 
Goin back to ya roots?
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 4Go to page : 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 Similar topics
-
» Balconing is back on the Baleares
» Gary Glitter - it's good to be back?
» Maybe sitting in the back of the Bus isn't a bad idea after all...
» Duke of Edinburgh back to his old self
» Model Back Template

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Murgatroyd's Drop-in centre and Forum :: Popular Topics :: Public Bar and Lounge-
Jump to: